Police Social Media News & Information

 

 

The internet is one of the most widely used information and communication highways in the world. Police Social Media has an important place on that highway but needs to drive carefully and not get detracted from it’s primary role of communicating with the public they serve.

There are relatively few laws governing the application and use of social media that have truly kept up with technology, and fewer self-imposed standards that govern its use. Social media police communications should play a consistent role in educating and updating people living and working in their communities about some of the unsavory aspects of being online.

Unfortunately, being online means we’re living and working with the criminal element. Scams, spoofs and spam are but a few nuisances that regularly reach into our lives. These are minor in nature compared to some ongoing criminal activities.

Social media has become fraught with criminal behavior. Post or Tweet a comment, upload a photo to Instagram, like a Facebook page, join a Google Hangout or look for a job and people will likely be plagued by attempts to get their personal information. Police social media can be a proactive way to educate community members about the possibility of being targeted for identity theft, exploitation, home invasion, “swatting” or personal attacks. Social media has become fraught with criminal behavior. Post or Tweet a comment, upload a photo to Instagram, like a Facebook page, join a Google Hangout or look for a job and people will likely be plagued by attempts to get their personal information. Police social media can be a proactive way to educate community members about the possibility of being targeted for identity theft, exploitation, home invasion, “swatting” or personal attacks.

“Law enforcement social media messaging should follow a simple “keep it simple stupid“ model,” says Police Social Media expert Chris Ryan. “Online scams get more creative by the minute and even the smartest among us can be tricked at some point,” said Ryan. “Ongoing and regular messaging from the Police Public Information Officer should be reinforced in posts, photos and videos.”

“Police Social Media Managers can use apps like Hootsuite to schedule posts and Tweets that remind community members to use their natural instincts and a gut-check,” says Ryan. “If it sounds too good to be true, it probably is and dangers are only a click or touch away,” he added.

Mr. Ryan is an internationally recognized expert in Police Media Relations, Police Social Media and Crisis / Image Management. He trains police, fire & public safety officials worldwide in how to proactively use social media and apps to better communicate with the communities they serve. He consults and trains agencies in the realm of direct communication, prevention and enforcement